SÝNING | EXHIBITION

25.10.18 - 06.01.19
Bæjarskrifstofur Kópavogs | Kópavogur City Hall

Opnunartímar | Opening hours
09:00 - 17:00
Man - Fös | Mon - Fri

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Julie Edel Hardenberg

Julie Edel Hardenberg lives and works in Nuuk. She holds a BA in Art from the Art Academy of Trondheim, Norway, and a MA in Art Theory and Communication from The Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Denmark. Her artwork has been exhibited at numerous international exhibitions, she is the author of several book publications, and has received awards and grants for both visual arts and writing. Hardenberg has also worked with scenography and installations for feature films, theater plays, and dance shows. In her works she applies a conscious, quirky, poetic and humorous approach to concepts such as ethnic and cultural identity.

Suppressed stories (2017), textile, human hair
Flags are a recurring theme in Hardenberg’s work as she deconstructs and confronts the problematic and intricate aspects of Danish-Greenlandic relations. Here, the suppressed stories of black-haired subjects protrude from the grand-narrative of The Red-and-White Kingdom. Like grass pushes through the cracks of a pavement, the embodied human trauma of colonialism wells up through historical amnesia and distorts the neatly arranged paternalistic narrative of colonial rule. The hair used in the work is sourced from Asia.

Julie Edel Hardenberg

Julie Edel Hardenberg lives and works in Nuuk. She holds a BA in Art from the Art Academy of Trondheim, Norway, and a MA in Art Theory and Communication from The Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Denmark. Her artwork has been exhibited at numerous international exhibitions, she is the author of several book publications, and has received awards and grants for both visual arts and writing. Hardenberg has also worked with scenography and installations for feature films, theater plays, and dance shows. In her works she applies a conscious, quirky, poetic and humorous approach to concepts such as ethnic and cultural identity.

Suppressed stories (2017), textile, human hair
Flags are a recurring theme in Hardenberg’s work as she deconstructs and confronts the problematic and intricate aspects of Danish-Greenlandic relations. Here, the suppressed stories of black-haired subjects protrude from the grand-narrative of The Red-and-White Kingdom. Like grass pushes through the cracks of a pavement, the embodied human trauma of colonialism wells up through historical amnesia and distorts the neatly arranged paternalistic narrative of colonial rule. The hair used in the work is sourced from Asia.